MCollective pgrep

The unix pgrep utility is great, it lets you grep through your process list and find interesting things. I wanted to do something similar but for my entire server group so built something quick ontop of MCollective.

I am using the Ruby sys-proctable gem to do the hard work, it returns a massive amount of information about each process and have written a simple agent on top of this.

The agent supports grepping the process tree but also supports kill and pgre+kill though I have not yet implemented more than the basic grep on the command line. Frankly the grep+kill combination scares me and I might remove it. A simple grep slipup and you will kill all processes on all your machine :) Sometimes too much power is too much and should just be avoided.

At the moment mc-pgrep outputs a set format but I intend to make that configurable on the command line, here’s a sample:

% mc-pgrep -C /dev_server/ ruby
 
 * [ ============================================================> ] 4 / 4
 
dev1.my.com
       root   9833  ruby /usr/sbin/mcollectived --pid=/var/run/mcollectived.pid 
       root  21608  /usr/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/passenger-2.2.2/lib/phusion_pass
 
dev2.my.com
       root  14568  /usr/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/passenger-2.2.2/lib/phusion_pass
       root  31595  ruby /usr/sbin/mcollectived --pid=/var/run/mcollectived.pid 
 
dev3.my.com
       root   1620  /usr/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/passenger-2.2.2/lib/phusion_pass
       root  14093  ruby /usr/sbin/mcollectived --pid=/var/run/mcollectived.pid 
 
dev4.my.com
       root   3231  /usr/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/passenger-2.2.2/lib/phusion_pass
       root  20557  ruby /usr/sbin/mcollectived --pid=/var/run/mcollectived.pid 
 
   ---- process list stats ----
        Matched hosts: 4
    Matched processes: 8
        Resident Size: 37.264KB
         Virtual Size: 629.578MB

You can also limit it to only find zombies with the -z option.

This has been quite interesting for me, if I limit the pgrep to “.” (the pattern is regex) every machine will send back a Sys::ProcTable hash for all its processes. This is a 50 to 70 KByte payload per server. I’ve so far seen no problem getting his much traffic through ActiveMQ + MCollective and processing it all in a very short time:

% time mc-pgrep -F "country=/uk|us/" .
 
   ---- process list stats ----
        Matched hosts: 20
    Matched processes: 1958
        Resident Size: 1.777MB
         Virtual Size: 60.072GB
 
mc-pgrep -F "country=/uk|us/" .  0.19s user 0.06s system 7% cpu 3.420 total

That 3.4 seconds is with a 2 second discovery overhead client machine in Germany and the filter matching UK and US machines – all the way to the West Coast – my biggest delay here is network and not MC or ActiveMQ.

The code can be found at my GitHub account and still a bit of a work in progress, wiki pages will follow once I am happy with it.

And as an aside, I am slowly migrating at least my code to GitHub if not wiki and ticketing. So far my Plugins have moved, MC will move soon too.

Xen Live Migration with MCollective

I retweeted this on twitter, but it’s just too good to not show. Over at rottenbytes.com Nicolas is showing some proof of concept code he wrote with MCollective that monitors the load on his dom0 machines and initiate live migrations of virtual machines to less loaded servers.

This is the kind of crazy functionality I wanted to enable with MCollective and it makes me very glad to see this kind of thing. The server side and client code combined is only 230 lines – very very impressive.

This is a part of what VMWare DRS does Nico has some ideas to add other sexy features as well as this was just a proof of concept. The logic for what to base migrations on will be driven by a small DSL for example.

I asked him how long it took to knock this together: time taken to get acquainted with MCollective combined with time to write the agent and client was only 2 days, that’s very impressive. He already knew Ruby well though :) And has a Ruby gem to integrate with Xen.

I’m copying the output from his code below, but absolutely head over to his blog to check it out he has the source up there too:

[mordor:~] ./mc-xen-balancer
[+] hypervisor2 : 0.0 load and 0 slice(s) running
[+] init/reset load counter for hypervisor2
[+] hypervisor2 has no slices consuming CPU time
[+] hypervisor3 : 1.11 load and 3 slice(s) running
[+] added test1 on hypervisor3 with 0 CPU time (registered 18.4 as a reference)
[+] added test2 on hypervisor3 with 0 CPU time (registered 19.4 as a reference)
[+] added test3 on hypervisor3 with 0 CPU time (registered 18.3 as a reference)
[+] sleeping for 30 seconds
 
[+] hypervisor2 : 0.0 load and 0 slice(s) running
[+] init/reset load counter for hypervisor2
[+] hypervisor2 has no slices consuming CPU time
[+] hypervisor3 : 1.33 load and 3 slice(s) running
[+] updated test1 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 18.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test2 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 19.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test3 on hypervisor3 with 1.5 CPU time eaten (registered 19.8 as a reference)
[+] sleeping for 30 seconds
 
[+] hypervisor2 : 0.16 load and 0 slice(s) running
[+] init/reset load counter for hypervisor2
[+] hypervisor2 has no slices consuming CPU time
[+] hypervisor3 : 1.33 load and 3 slice(s) running
[+] updated test1 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 18.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test2 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 19.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test3 on hypervisor3 with 1.7 CPU time eaten (registered 21.5 as a reference)
[+] hypervisor3 has 3 threshold overload
[+] Time to see if we can migrate a VM from hypervisor3
[+] VM key : hypervisor3-test3
[+] Time consumed in a run (interval is 30s) : 1.7
[+] hypervisor2 is a candidate for being a host (step 1 : max VMs)
[+] hypervisor2 is a candidate for being a host (step 2 : max load)
trying to migrate test3 from hypervisor3 to hypervisor2 (10.0.0.2)
Successfully migrated test3 !

Mcollective & Xen : naughty things

eth0I already blogged about my experiments with mcollective & xen but I had something a little bigger in my mind. A friend had sent me a video showing some vmware neat features (DRS mainly) with VMs migrating through hypervisors automatically.

So I wrote a “proof of concept” of what you can do with an awesome tool like mcollective. The setup of this funny game is the following :

  • 1 box used a iSCSI target that serves volumes to the world
  • 2 xen hypervisors (lenny packages) using open-iscsi iSCSI initiator to connect to the target. VMs are stored in LVM, nothing fancy

The 3 boxens are connected on a 100Mb network and the hypervisors have an additionnal gigabit network card with a crossover cable to link them (yes, this is a lab setup). You can find a live migration howto here.

For the mcollective part I used my Xen agent (slightly modified from the previous post to support migration), which is based on my xen gem. The client is the largest part of the work but it’s still less than 200 lines of code. It can (and will) be improved because all the config is hardcoded. It would also deserve a little DSL to be able to handle more “logic” than “if load is superior to foo” but as I said before, it’s a proof of concept.

Let’s see it in action :

hypervisor2:~# xm list
Name                                        ID   Mem VCPUs      State   Time(s)
Domain-0                                     0   233     2     r-----    873.5
hypervisor3:~# xm list
Name                                        ID   Mem VCPUs      State   Time(s)
Domain-0                                     0   232     2     r-----  78838.0
test1                                        6   256     1     -b----     18.4
test2                                        4   256     1     -b----     19.3
test3                                       20   256     1     r-----     11.9

test3 is a VM that is “artificially” loaded, as is the machine “hypervisor3″ (to trigger migration)

[mordor:~] ./mc-xen-balancer
[+] hypervisor2 : 0.0 load and 0 slice(s) running
[+] init/reset load counter for hypervisor2
[+] hypervisor2 has no slices consuming CPU time
[+] hypervisor3 : 1.11 load and 3 slice(s) running
[+] added test1 on hypervisor3 with 0 CPU time (registered 18.4 as a reference)
[+] added test2 on hypervisor3 with 0 CPU time (registered 19.4 as a reference)
[+] added test3 on hypervisor3 with 0 CPU time (registered 18.3 as a reference)
[+] sleeping for 30 seconds

[+] hypervisor2 : 0.0 load and 0 slice(s) running
[+] init/reset load counter for hypervisor2
[+] hypervisor2 has no slices consuming CPU time
[+] hypervisor3 : 1.33 load and 3 slice(s) running
[+] updated test1 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 18.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test2 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 19.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test3 on hypervisor3 with 1.5 CPU time eaten (registered 19.8 as a reference)
[+] sleeping for 30 seconds

[+] hypervisor2 : 0.16 load and 0 slice(s) running
[+] init/reset load counter for hypervisor2
[+] hypervisor2 has no slices consuming CPU time
[+] hypervisor3 : 1.33 load and 3 slice(s) running
[+] updated test1 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 18.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test2 on hypervisor3 with 0.0 CPU time eaten (registered 19.4 as a reference)
[+] updated test3 on hypervisor3 with 1.7 CPU time eaten (registered 21.5 as a reference)
[+] hypervisor3 has 3 threshold overload
[+] Time to see if we can migrate a VM from hypervisor3
[+] VM key : hypervisor3-test3
[+] Time consumed in a run (interval is 30s) : 1.7
[+] hypervisor2 is a candidate for being a host (step 1 : max VMs)
[+] hypervisor2 is a candidate for being a host (step 2 : max load)
trying to migrate test3 from hypervisor3 to hypervisor2 (10.0.0.2)
Successfully migrated test3 !

Let’s see our hypervisors :

hypervisor2:~# xm list
Name                                        ID   Mem VCPUs      State   Time(s)
Domain-0                                     0   233     2     r-----    878.9
test3                                       25   256     1     -b----      1.1
hypervisor3:~# xm list
Name                                        ID   Mem VCPUs      State   Time(s)
Domain-0                                     0   232     2     r-----  79079.3
test1                                        6   256     1     -b----     18.4
test2                                        4   256     1     -b----     19.4

A little word about configuration options :

  • interval : the poll time in seconds.  this should not be too low, let the machine some time and avoid load peeks to distort the logic.
  • load_threshold : where you consider the machine load is too high and that it is time to move some stuff away (tampered with max_over, see below)
  • daemonize : not used yet
  • max_over : maximum time (in minutes) where load should be superior to the limit. When reached, it’s time, really. Don’t set it too low and at least 2*interval or sampling will not be efficient
  • debug : well….
  • max_vm_per_host : the maximum VMs a host can handle. If a host already hit this limit it will not be candidate for receiving a VM
  • max_load_candidate : same thing as above, but for the load
  • host_mapping : a simple CSV file to handle non-DNS destinations (typically my crossover cable address have no DNS entries)

What is left to do :

  • Add some barriers to avoid migration madness to let load go down after a migration or to avoid migrating a VM permanently
  • Add a DSL to insert some more logic
  • Write a real client, not a big fat loop

Enjoy the tool !

Files :

Authorization plugins for MCollective SimpleRPC

Till now The Marionette Collective has relied on your middleware to provide all authorization and authentication for requests. You’re able to restrict certain middleware users from certain agents, but nothing more fine grained.

In many cases you want to provide much finer grain control over who can do what, some cases could be:

  • A certain user can only request service restarts on machines with a fact customer=acme
  • A user can do any service restart but only on machines that has a certain configuration management class
  • You want to deny all users except root from being able to stop services, others can still restart and start them

This kind of thing is required for large infrastructures with lots of admins all working in their own group of machines but perhaps a central NOC need to be able to work on all the machines, you need fine grain control over who can do what and we did not have this will now. It would also be needed if you wanted to give clients control over their own servers but not others.

Version 0.4.5 will have support for this kind of scheme for SimpleRPC agents. We wont provide a authorization plugin out of the box with the core distribution but I’ve made one which will be available as a plugin.

So how would you write an auth plugin, first a typical agent would be:

module MCollective
    module Agent
         class Service<RPC::Agent
             authorized_by :action_policy
 
             # ....
         end
    end
end

The new authorized_by keyword tells MCollective to use the class MCollective::Util::ActionPolicy to do any authorization on this agent.

The ActionPolicy class can be pretty simple, if it raises any kind of exception the action will be denied.

module MCollective
    module Util
         class ActionPolicy
              def self.authorize(request)
                  unless request.caller == "uid=500"
                      raise("You are not allow access to #{request.agent}::#{request.action}")
                  end
              end
         end
    end
end

This simple check will deny all requests from anyone but Unix user id 500.

It’s pretty simple to come up with your own schemes, I wrote one that allows you to make policy files like the one below for the service agent:

policy default deny
allow   uid=500 *                    *                *
allow   uid=502 status               *                *
allow   uid=600 *                    customer=acme    acme::devserver

This will allow user 500 to do everything with the service agent. User 502 can get the status of any service on any node. User 600 will be able to do any actions on machines with the fact customer=acme that also has the configuration management class acme::devserver on them. Everything else will be denied.

You can do multiple facts and multiple classes in a simple space separated list. The entire plugin to implement such policy controls was only 120 – heavy commented – lines of code.

I think this is a elegant and easy to use layer that provides a lot of functionality. We might in future pass more information about the caller to the nodes. There’s some limitations, specifically about the source of the caller information being essentially user provided so you need to keep that mind.

As mentioned this will be in MCollective 0.4.5.

Meet the marionette

eth0Another cool project I keep an eye on for some weeks is “the marionette collective“, aka mcollective. This project is leaded & develloped by R.I. Pienaar, one of the most active people in the puppet world too.

Mcollective is an framework for distributed sysadmin. It relies on a messaging framework and has many features included : flexibility, speed, easy to understand.

Some time ago, I had wrote a tool called “whosyourdaddy” to help me (and my memory as big as a goldfish one) to find on which Xen dom0 a Xen domU was living. It worked fine, expect the fact that is was not dynamic : if a VM was migrated  from a dom0 to another, I had to update the CMDB. Not really reliable (if an update fails the CMDB is no more accurate) and I didn’t want to have to embed this constraint in the Xen logic. So I decided to try out to write my own mcollective agent and here it is ! It is built on top of a (very) small ruby module for xen and has it own client.

You can find on which dom0 a domU resides :

master1:~# ./mc-xen -a find --domu test
hypervisor2              : Absent
hypervisor1              : Absent
master1:~# ./mc-xen -a find --domu domu2
hypervisor2              : Present
hypervisor1              : Absent

Or list your domUs :

master1:~# ./mc-xen -a list
hypervisor2              
 domu2

hypervisor1              
 no domU running

Download the agent & the client

MCollective Release 0.4.4

I just released version 0.4.4 of The Marionette Collective. This release is primarily a bug fix release addressing issues with log files and general code cleanups.

The biggest change in this release is that controlling the daemon has become better, you can ask it to reload an agent or all agents and a few other bits. Read all about it on the wiki..

Please see the Release Notes, Changelog and Download List for full details.

For background information about the MCollective project please see the project website.