Decomissioning my Drupal blog

If you are looking at this blog post right now... my live Drupal site has finally been decommissioned.. or not .. well these pages are served statically but the content is still generated by an ancient aging Drupal 6, which is hiding somewhere in a container that I only start when I need it.

Given my current low blog volume .. and the lack of time to actually migrate all the content to something like Jekyll or Webby I took the middle road and pulled the internet facing Drupal offline. My main concern was that I want to keep a number of articles that people frequently point to in the exact same location as before. So that was my main requirement, but with no more public facing drupal I have no more worrying about the fact that it really needed updating, no more worrying about potential issues on wednesday evenings etc

My first couple of experiments were with wget / curl but I bumped into. Sending a Drupal site into retirement which pointed me to httrack which was a new tool for me ..

As documented there
httrack http://127.0.0.1:8080/blog -O . -N "%h%p/%n/index%[page].%t" -WqQ%v --robots=0
creates a usuable tree but root page ends up in blog/blog which is not really handy.
So the quick hack for that is to go into the blog/blog subdir and regexp the hell out of all those files generated there direction one level below :)
for file in `ls`; do cat $file | sed -e "s/..///blog//g" > ../$file ; done

httrack however has one annoying default in which it puts metatdata in the footer of a page it mirrors, where it comes from and when it was generated thats very usefull for some use cases, but not for mine as it means that every time I regenerate the site it actually generates slightly different content rather than identical pages. Luckily I found the -%F "" param to keep that footerstring empty

And that is what you are looking at right now ...

There are still a bunch of articles I have in draft .. so maybe now that I don't have to worry about the Drupal part of things I might blog more frequent again, or not..

Decomissioning my Drupal blog

If you are looking at this blog post right now... my live Drupal site has finally been decommissioned.. or not .. well these pages are served statically but the content is still generated by an ancient aging Drupal 6, which is hiding somewhere in a container that I only start when I need it.

Given my current low blog volume .. and the lack of time to actually migrate all the content to something like Jekyll or Webby I took the middle road and pulled the internet facing Drupal offline. My main concern was that I want to keep a number of articles that people frequently point to in the exact same location as before. So that was my main requirement, but with no more public facing drupal I have no more worrying about the fact that it really needed updating, no more worrying about potential issues on wednesday evenings etc

My first couple of experiments were with wget / curl but I bumped into. Sending a Drupal site into retirement which pointed me to httrack which was a new tool for me ..

As documented there
httrack http://krisbuytaert.be/blog -O . -N "%h%p/%n/index%[page].%t" -WqQ%v --robots=0
creates a usuable tree but root page ends up in blog/blog which is not really handy.
So the quick hack for that is to go into the blog/blog subdir and regexp the hell out of all those files generated there direction one level below :)
for file in `ls`; do cat $file | sed -e "s/..///blog//g" > ../$file ; done

httrack however has one annoying default in which it puts metatdata in the footer of a page it mirrors, where it comes from and when it was generated thats very usefull for some use cases, but not for mine as it means that every time I regenerate the site it actually generates slightly different content rather than identical pages. Luckily I found the -%F "" param to keep that footerstring empty

And that is what you are looking at right now ...

There are still a bunch of articles I have in draft .. so maybe now that I don't have to worry about the Drupal part of things I might blog more frequent again, or not..

Will containers take over ?

and if so why haven't they done so yet ?

Unlike many people think, containers are not new, they have been around for more than a decade, they however just became popular for a larger part of our ecosystem. Some people think containers will eventually take over.

Imvho It is all about application workloads, when 8 years ago I wrote about a decade of open source virtualization, we looked at containers as the solution for running a large number of isolated instances of something on a machine. And with large we meant hundreds or more instances of apache, this was one of the example use cases for an ISP that wanted to give a secure but isolated platform to his users. One container per user.

The majority of enterprise usecases however were full VM's Partly because we were still consolidating existing services to VM's and weren't planning on changing the deployment patterns yet. But mainly because most organisations didn't have the need to run 100 similar or identical instances of an application or a service, they were going from 4 bare metal servers to 40 something VM's but they had not yet come to the need to run 100's of them. The software architecture had just moved from FatClient applications that talked directly to bloated relational databases containing business logic, to web enabled multi-tier
applications. In those days when you suggested to run 1 Tomcat instance per VM because VM's were cheap and it would make management easier, (Oh oops I shut down the wrong tomcat instance) , people gave you very weird looks

Slowly software architectures are changing , today the new breed of applications is small, single function, dedicated, and it interacts frequently with it's peers, together combined they provide similar functionality as a big fat application 10 years ago, But when you look at the market that new breed is a minority. So a modern application might consist of 30-50 really small ones, all with different deployment speeds. And unlike 10 years ago where we needed to fight hard to be able to build both dev, acceptance and production platforms, people now consider that practice normal. So today we do get environments that quickly go to 100+ instances , but requiring similar CPU power as before, so the use case for containers like we proposed it in the early days is now slowly becoming a more common use case.

So yes containers might take over ... but before that happens .. a lot of software architectures will need to change, a lot of elephants will need to be sliced, and that is usually what
blocks cloud, container, agile and devops adoption.

Will containers take over ?

and if so why haven't they done so yet ?

Unlike many people think, containers are not new, they have been around for more than a decade, they however just became popular for a larger part of our ecosystem. Some people think containers will eventually take over.

Imvho It is all about application workloads, when 8 years ago I wrote about a decade of open source virtualization, we looked at containers as the solution for running a large number of isolated instances of something on a machine. And with large we meant hundreds or more instances of apache, this was one of the example use cases for an ISP that wanted to give a secure but isolated platform to his users. One container per user.

The majority of enterprise usecases however were full VM's Partly because we were still consolidating existing services to VM's and weren't planning on changing the deployment patterns yet. But mainly because most organisations didn't have the need to run 100 similar or identical instances of an application or a service, they were going from 4 bare metal servers to 40 something VM's but they had not yet come to the need to run 100's of them. The software architecture had just moved from FatClient applications that talked directly to bloated relational databases containing business logic, to web enabled multi-tier
applications. In those days when you suggested to run 1 Tomcat instance per VM because VM's were cheap and it would make management easier, (Oh oops I shut down the wrong tomcat instance) , people gave you very weird looks

Slowly software architectures are changing , today the new breed of applications is small, single function, dedicated, and it interacts frequently with it's peers, together combined they provide similar functionality as a big fat application 10 years ago, But when you look at the market that new breed is a minority. So a modern application might consist of 30-50 really small ones, all with different deployment speeds. And unlike 10 years ago where we needed to fight hard to be able to build both dev, acceptance and production platforms, people now consider that practice normal. So today we do get environments that quickly go to 100+ instances , but requiring similar CPU power as before, so the use case for containers like we proposed it in the early days is now slowly becoming a more common use case.

So yes containers might take over ... but before that happens .. a lot of software architectures will need to change, a lot of elephants will need to be sliced, and that is usually what blocks cloud, container, agile and devops adoption.

Will containers take over ?

and if so why haven't they done so yet ?

Unlike many people think, containers are not new, they have been around for more than a decade, they however just became popular for a larger part of our ecosystem. Some people think containers will eventually take over.

Imvho It is all about application workloads, when 8 years ago I wrote about a decade of open source virtualization, we looked at containers as the solution for running a large number of isolated instances of something on a machine. And with large we meant hundreds or more instances of apache, this was one of the example use cases for an ISP that wanted to give a secure but isolated platform to his users. One container per user.

The majority of enterprise usecases however were full VM's Partly because we were still consolidating existing services to VM's and weren't planning on changing the deployment patterns yet. But mainly because most organisations didn't have the need to run 100 similar or identical instances of an application or a service, they were going from 4 bare metal servers to 40 something VM's but they had not yet come to the need to run 100's of them. The software architecture had just moved from FatClient applications that talked directly to bloated relational databases containing business logic, to web enabled multi-tier
applications. In those days when you suggested to run 1 Tomcat instance per VM because VM's were cheap and it would make management easier, (Oh oops I shut down the wrong tomcat instance) , people gave you very weird looks

Slowly software architectures are changing , today the new breed of applications is small, single function, dedicated, and it interacts frequently with it's peers, together combined they provide similar functionality as a big fat application 10 years ago, But when you look at the market that new breed is a minority. So a modern application might consist of 30-50 really small ones, all with different deployment speeds. And unlike 10 years ago where we needed to fight hard to be able to build both dev, acceptance and production platforms, people now consider that practice normal. So today we do get environments that quickly go to 100+ instances , but requiring similar CPU power as before, so the use case for containers like we proposed it in the early days is now slowly becoming a more common use case.

So yes containers might take over ... but before that happens .. a lot of software architectures will need to change, a lot of elephants will need to be sliced, and that is usually what blocks cloud, container, agile and devops adoption.

Jenkins DSL and Heisenbugs

I`m working on getting even more moving parts automated, those who use Jenkins frequently probably also have Love - Hate relationship with it.

The love coming from the flexibility , stability and the power you get from it, the hate from it's UI. If you've ever had to create a new Jenkins job or even pipeline based on one that already existed you've gone trough the horror of click and paste errors , and you know where the hate breeds.

We've been trying to automate this with different levels of success, we've puppetized the XML jobs, we've used the Buildflow Plugin (reusing the same job for different pipelines is a bad idea..) We played with JJB running into issues with some plugins (Promoted Build) and most recently we have put our hope in the Job DSL.

While toying with the DSL I ran into a couple of interresting behaviours. Imagine you have an entry like this which is supposed to replace the $foldername with the content of the variable and actually take the correct upstream

  1. cloneWorkspace('${foldername}/dashing-dashboard-test', 'Successful')

You generate the job, look inside the Jenkins UI to verify what the build result was .. save the job and run it .. success ..
Then a couple of times later that same job gives an error ... It can't find the upstream job to copy the workspace from. You once again open up the job in the UI, look at it .. save it , run it again and then it works.. a typical case of Heisenbug ..

When you start looking closer to the XML of the job you notice ..

  1. <parentJobName>${foldername}/dashing-dashboard-test</parentJobName>

obviously wrong .. I should have used double quotes ..

But why doesn't it look wrong in the UI ? That's because the UI autoselects the first option from it's autogenerated pull down list .. Which actually contains the right upstream workplace I wanted to trigger (that will teach me to use 00 as a prefix for the foldername for all my tests..)

So when working with the DSL .. review the generated XML .. not just if the job works ..

Jenkins DSL and Heisenbugs

I`m working on getting even more moving parts automated, those who use Jenkins frequently probably also have Love - Hate relationship with it.

The love coming from the flexibility , stability and the power you get from it, the hate from it's UI. If you've ever had to create a new Jenkins job or even pipeline based on one that already existed you've gone trough the horror of click and paste errors , and you know where the hate breeds.

We've been trying to automate this with different levels of success, we've puppetized the XML jobs, we've used the Buildflow Plugin (reusing the same job for different pipelines is a bad idea..) We played with JJB running into issues with some plugins (Promoted Build) and most recently we have put our hope in the Job DSL.

While toying with the DSL I ran into a couple of interresting behaviours. Imagine you have an entry like this which is supposed to replace the $foldername with the content of the variable and actually take the correct upstream

  1. cloneWorkspace('${foldername}/dashing-dashboard-test', 'Successful')

You generate the job, look inside the Jenkins UI to verify what the build result was .. save the job and run it .. success ..
Then a couple of times later that same job gives an error ... It can't find the upstream job to copy the workspace from. You once again open up the job in the UI, look at it .. save it , run it again and then it works.. a typical case of Heisenbug ..

When you start looking closer to the XML of the job you notice ..

  1. <parentJobName>${foldername}/dashing-dashboard-test</parentJobName>

obviously wrong .. I should have used double quotes ..

But why doesn't it look wrong in the UI ? That's because the UI autoselects the first option from it's autogenerated pull down list .. Which actually contains the right upstream workplace I wanted to trigger (that will teach me to use 00 as a prefix for the foldername for all my tests..)

So when working with the DSL .. review the generated XML .. not just if the job works ..

Jenkins DSL and Heisenbugs

I`m working on getting even more moving parts automated, those who use Jenkins frequently probably also have Love - Hate relationship with it.

The love coming from the flexibility , stability and the power you get from it, the hate from it's UI. If you've ever had to create a new Jenkins job or even pipeline based on one that already existed you've gone trough the horror of click and paste errors , and you know where the hate breeds.

We've been trying to automate this with different levels of success, we've puppetized the XML jobs, we've used the Buildflow Plugin (reusing the same job for different pipelines is a bad idea..) We played with JJB running into issues with some plugins (Promoted Build) and most recently we have put our hope in the Job DSL.

While toying with the DSL I ran into a couple of interresting behaviours. Imagine you have an entry like this which is supposed to replace the $foldername with the content of the variable and actually take the correct upstream

  1. cloneWorkspace('${foldername}/dashing-dashboard-test', 'Successful')

You generate the job, look inside the Jenkins UI to verify what the build result was .. save the job and run it .. success ..
Then a couple of times later that same job gives an error ... It can't find the upstream job to copy the workspace from. You once again open up the job in the UI, look at it .. save it , run it again and then it works.. a typical case of Heisenbug ..

When you start looking closer to the XML of the job you notice ..

  1. <parentJobName>${foldername}/dashing-dashboard-test</parentJobName>

obviously wrong .. I should have used double quotes ..

But why doesn't it look wrong in the UI ? That's because the UI autoselects the first option from it's autogenerated pull down list .. Which actually contains the right upstream workplace I wanted to trigger (that will teach me to use 00 as a prefix for the foldername for all my tests..)

So when working with the DSL .. review the generated XML .. not just if the job works ..

Linux Troubleshooting 101 , 2016 Edition

Back in 2006 I wrote a blog post about linux troubleshoooting. Bert Van Vreckem pointed out that it might be time for an update ..

There's not that much that has changed .. however :)

Everything is a DNS Problem

Everything is a Fscking DNS Problem
No really, Everything is a Fscking DNS Problem
If it's not a fucking DNS Problem ..
It's a Full Filesystem Problem
If your filesystem isn't full
It is a SELinux problem
If you have SELinux disabled
It might be an ntp problem
If it's not an ntp problem
It's an arp problem
If it's not an arp problem...
It is a Java Garbage Collection problem
If you ain't running Java
It's a natting problem
If you are already on IPv6
It's a Spanning Tree problem
If it's not a spanning Tree problem...
It's a USB problem
If it's not a USB Problem
It's a sharing IRQ Problem
If it's not a sharing IRQ Problem
But most often .. its a Freaking Dns Problem !

`

Linux Troubleshooting 101 , 2016 Edition

Back in 2006 I wrote a blog post about linux troubleshoooting. Bert Van Vreckem pointed out that it might be time for an update ..

There's not that much that has changed .. however :)

Everything is a DNS Problem

Everything is a Fscking DNS Problem
No really, Everything is a Fscking DNS Problem
If it's not a fucking DNS Problem ..
It's a Full Filesystem Problem
If your filesystem isn't full
It is a SELinux problem
If you have SELinux disabled
It might be an ntp problem
If it's not an ntp problem
It's an arp problem
If it's not an arp problem...
It is a Java Garbage Collection problem
If you ain't running Java
It's a natting problem
If you are already on IPv6
It's a Spanning Tree problem
If it's not a spanning Tree problem...
It's a USB problem
If it's not a USB Problem
It's a sharing IRQ Problem
If it's not a sharing IRQ Problem
But most often .. its a Freaking Dns Problem !

`